Coronavirus-FHA 680 FICO

Things are moving so quickly in the market with the coronavirus being at the forefront, everyone is feeling hardship across the board.

FHA Loans provides mortgage insurance on loans made by FHA-approved lenders throughout the United States and its territories.  It is one of the largest insurers of mortgages in the world, insuring more than 46 million mortgages since its inception in 1934 and it's the only government agency that operates from its self-generated income.

Self-generated income which means the Mortgage insurance premiums that is collected from borrowers via lenders are used to operate the program.

FICO scores tells the lender what type of credit risk you are and what your interest rate should be to reflect that risk by utilizing a FICO formula.

The most commonalty used :

Equifax Beacon 5.0

Experian/Fair Isaac Risk Model v2

TransUnion FICO Risk Score 04

We’re seeing what’s “good” for rates can be bad for lenders, and what’s “good” for the market can be bad for home buyers. This tug of war has caused servicers to implement drastic measures to keep up; includes raising the minimum FICO.  If you have questions or concerns please contact your lender right away.

Mortgage Rates March 17, 2020

Mortgage Headliners: 

Economist predicting emergency rate cut this week…
Negative Interest Rates Unlikely…
Coronavirus economic package in full...
Trump is considers letting homeowners delay mortgage payments...

We’re watching the market closely…

If you’re in the market to purchase or refinance give us a call today (888) 931-9444 or (702) 696-9900

Mortgage Rates March 12, 2020

Mortgage Headliners: 

A flood of mortgage applications drive rates higher...
How the coronavirus outbreak is moving mortgage…
Mortgage rates rise sharply from last week's record low…
Mortgage rates are mixed after hitting all-time lows…
Mortgage demand is so high that lenders turn away…
Coronavirus looms over crucial spring season for housing…
Bonds are responding…

We're watching the market closely...

If you’re in the market to purchase or refinance give us a call today (888) 931-9444 or (702) 696-9900

Mortgage Rates March 11, 2020

Mortgage Headliners: 

Mortgage applications increase over 55%...
Refinance applications surge to decade high...
Plunging mortgage rates might not end U.S. Housing...
Mortgage rates rising at fastest place…
The US should suspend mortgage and rent payments…
The banks are back in residential mortgages…
U.S. mortgage lenders urge customers to ask about forbearance…

Lock Recommended

If you’re in the market to purchase or refinance give us a call today (888) 931-9444 or (702) 696-9900

What is Debt To Income

Your debt to income ratio or DTI, is a figure that allows a lender to analyze your monthly spending habits. They use your DTI to determine how you manage your money.

You want your debt to income to be as low as possible to ensure that your chances of being offered a lower rate is better.

How much debt do you have this month?

Think about all of the bills you have to pay for the upcoming month.

For example, Brandi pays $720 monthly for rent, $235 monthly for her car note, $200 monthly for her car insurance, and she makes about $100 monthly in credit card and utility bills. Brandi earns $4000 every month before taxes. So if we add up Brandi’s debt expenses and divide them by 4000, we get approximately 31%.

An article from consumerfinance.gov recommends keeping your debt to income ratio below 43% based on evidence from studies on mortgage loans. So when our friend Brandi is ready to move from her apartment into a new home, the bank will be eager to get things started for her, knowing that her debt to income ratio is low and that she has the ability to repay her loan.

Debt to income factors

Another factor that can help your debt income ratio is paying your bills on time and in full. Most banks offer the option to have money from your account wired directly to the institution you wish you pay. You can even customize the time and date that the wire will be released. As a result, before applying for a mortgage loan be sure that the job you are currently holding will provide you with the means to pay your current bills and a house payment.

Higher income means more flexibility to play around with financing options. What lenders don’t want to see is that you spend six months at every job and then bail. It shows instability and lenders won’t be so open to lending their money to someone who is in the business of making risky decisions by jumping from job to job.

Be sure to use that steady job to help build your savings. Why? Because of a thing called a Cash Reserve. Your cash reserve is your safety net. Money that you have saved up between your bank accounts will be evaluated by your lender. This extra money lets the lender know that if you fall on hard times or your expenses for some reason go up, you will still have the money to pay your household bills and still make regular payments on your loan, therefore keeping your DTI constant.

What lenders typically look for is a cash reserve that will hold you over for two or more months, so be sure to pad those savings accounts.

The impact of student loan debt

A meaningful proportion of current student loan borrowers will likely be flirting with a risky DTI just from student loan debt. 16% of Student Loan Borrowers Will Likely Have a DTI Over 20% Just From Student Loans. Below shows sample data from Lendedu: 10,000 pre-qualification applicants used.

The above statistics derive from proprietary data provided to LendEDU by student loan lender Funding U. DTI ratios for nearly 10,000 pre-qualification applications for private student loans were calculated by Funding U using metrics like projected first year salary, projected student loan debt upon graduating, and projected monthly student loan debt payments

Debt to income is an important factor when applying for a home loan. Be sure to take this critical component into consideration when you go to speak with your lender.

Preparing for Your First Mortgage

Buying a house is not something you should do without some good financial knowledge and advice. Your first mortgage should be thoroughly thought out and well planned. Now that you’re thinking of purchasing a home, use the next 12-18 months or so to prepare yourself.

Prepare Your Credit Early

Houses are not cheap. In order to pay for one, you’ll have to get a home loan and pay it off in monthly installments. How much you’ll have to pay is dependent upon your mortgage lender and your credit score. You credit can take a while to build and even longer to repair if it’s damaged, so start working on it early. See an article by Megan Ortiz on how to Establish, Raise, and Maintain your credit score HERE . Get into the habit of paying everything on time even if it doesn’t go on your credit report. Make a detailed list or a spreadsheet of all of your financial responsibilities from utility bills to student loans. If you practice good habits, eventually they will become second nature. Be meticulous about getting things paid on time or early if you can. Practice makes perfect.

Pay Off Your Debt

Loan officers are going to calculate your debt to income ratio, so the less debt you have the better. Things like car notes and credit card payments will be looked at and taken into consideration before a lender will agree to give you a loan. If the total amount of the debt you already have plus the debt you will have after being given a home loan will exceed 43% of your total income, you’re going to have a tough time getting someone to lend to you. So be sure to calculate your debt and pay it down to the lowest amount possible.

Visit Valley West Mortgage and Meet with a Loan Officer

Before even looking at homes, it’s a good idea to sit down and chit chat with a loan officer. Let him or her know your intentions, what kind of home you wish to buy and how much you’re willing to spend. He should be able to run some numbers for you and give you a breakdown of how much you can afford and how much his company would be willing to lend to you, including rates and such.You want to feel comfortable doing business with your chosen mortgage company so ask as many questions as necessary. Any loan officer that isn’t willing to take his time with you and answer your questions isn’t worth your time.

Keep Accurate Records

Start keeping your tax returns, pay stubs, and banks statements in a safe and secure place. In this digital age, it’s easy to order your financial documents from the IRS or from your bank, so be sure to acquire and retain a few copies somewhere at home, as these are documents that you will have to provide to your mortgage company when they are processing your loan.

Don’t Over Spend

As we all know, getting a new home is exciting and I’m sure you’ll be busting at the seams with new decorative ideas for your home. However, keep in mind the hefty amounts of money that have to be spent just to purchase the home (closing costs, down payments, etc.). Don’t go spending all of your extra money, preparing for a new home and then end up without a home to put all of your stuff in because your credit report came back indicating that you don’t know how to handle money.

Last but not Least, Keep a Steady Income!

In order to qualify for a loan, you must have a solid work history. The reason why? Because no one is going to want to lend to you if they don’t know that you have the means to repay them. Having a job is good, keeping a job is even better. Another thing is the type of pay you receive. If you’re on salary where you work, you’re more than likely in a career based job, which means you’ve probably been in your position for a while and you aren’t likely to leave that company any time soon. If you’re on an hourly job, and you haven’t been there for a solid 18-24 months you may have a harder time convincing your loan officer that you aren’t going to default on your loan.

The biggest tip that I can give you is to be prepared. Acquiring a new home is a big step, and it’s not one that should be taken lightly. If you aren’t financially ready to buy a new home, take these few steps to get yourself ready. There is nothing more joyous than owning your own home, you deserve it!

 

 

whitney_rush WHITNEY RUSH, VALLEY WEST MORTGAGE

Loan Basics

What is a Loan?

An amount that you borrow and agree to repay under specific terms.

Usually a formal agreement, loans involve two parties: the borrower and the lender.

The contract specifies the terms and conditions of the loan, and once you sign, you are legally obligated to adhere to it.

Before pursuing and taking out a loan, learn how they work and how you can borrow smartly, safely and at the lowest possible cost.

The Basics

These are the essentials on how loans work:

  • You take out a loan when you borrow money from a lender.
  • The amount you borrow is paid back over time, plus interest and applicable fees.
  • Lenders will require an application and consider your credit rating, income and other factors when determining loan approval.
  • Interest rates are determined by your credit rating and other qualifying factors. They can be fixed or variable.
  • Your loan's term is the amount of time you take to pay back the amount borrowed. Loan terms vary depending on loan type, lender and your credit rating
  • Considering how much you need to borrow and comparing loan terms across different lenders could help you save money.
  • The concept of loans is simple on the surface: You borrow money and pay it back. But it's worthwhile to dig deeper. The more you understand, the better you can avoid financial trouble. Being knowledgeable can help you borrow the right amount of money, agree to an affordable payment and payoff term, and find the best interest rate you can qualify for.

Loan Types

There are two basic types of loans: secured and unsecured.

Secured loans are collateralize by money in a separate account, the property you purchase or other assets, such as your home or vehicle. If you don't repay as agreed, the lender can claim the collateral to pay off the debt. Because of this guarantee, the lender's level of risk is low.

Unsecured loans do not require collateral, so they are more of a gamble for the lender.

Common loan types include:

  • Personal loans can be used to pay for nearly any use, though some lenders have restrictions such as no business or education use. They are often used to consolidate existing debt or finance an upcoming expense, like a wedding. Most are unsecured, though secured personal loans are available.
  • Business loans are for launching or operating a business. They may be secured (with cash in deposit accounts, property, or business or personal assets) or unsecured.
  • Student loans are for higher education costs. Federal student loans are offered through the U.S. Department of Education, including undergraduate, graduate and parent loans.
  • Car loans are used to buy a vehicle such as a car or truck and are typically secured by the vehicle.
  • Home loans, also known as mortgages,help people buy real estate. As with car loans, the property you purchase usually acts as security for the loan.

The Loan Process

Some types of loans are more involved than others. For example, you may have to submit extensive paperwork in underwriting for mortgages or business loans. But the overall process is fairly consistent with all loan types.

Applying: Some lenders offer prequalification or preapproval, but to actually obtain a loan, you'll ultimately need to fill out an application. A loan application will ask for personal information, typically your name, date of birth, Social Security number, address, phone number and email address. You'll typically need to include income and employment details. Some loan types may require details about your assets (cash in savings and investment accounts, as well as any property) and liabilities (your financial obligations).

Qualifying: Once your application is received, the lender will assess it for approval. This is also known as underwriting. With most loans, this is when a lender will check your credit report and score. At this point, the lender will decide whether you're approved for the loan and if so, what terms you qualify for, such as the loan amount and annual percentage rate. For some loans, like mortgages, loan processing and underwriting may include appraisal, inspection and other steps to gather more information about the property or your financial status.

Disbursement: If you qualify for the loan, the funds will be disbursed to you or a designated recipient, such as a title company for mortgages. Disbursement may also be referred to as loan closing. Disbursement time can vary widely depending on loan type and individual lenders. Online lenders may offer access to funds within 24 hours with an electronic deposit. Disbursement for other loans can take longer. For example, it can take two weeks to two months for a private student loan to be sent to you or your college. Whenever and wherever the money lands, it becomes your debt once it's disbursed.

Paying the balance: The payment amount and due date will be listed on the agreement you signed. A portion of your payment will go toward financing, and the rest will be applied to the principal. If the lender uses the simple interest method, interest will be calculated on the outstanding balance due. If you increase the payment, interest fees will decrease along with your debt. On the other hand, if the lender computes interest prior to, the interest for the term of the loan is already factored in, so you won't reduce interest if you pay the loan early.

The lender may report activity on the loan to the three credit reporting agencies: Experian, TransUnion and Equifax. Paying on time can improve your credit rating and save you money by avoiding late fees.

Refinancing: You might want to change your loan's terms at some point – for example, getting a lower interest rate or extending your loan's repayment term. Refinancing is essentially getting a new loan to pay off an older one, ideally with better terms.

Remember that, as a borrower, you have the power to choose which loan type works best for you. Research the best terms that you can qualify for, then borrow prudently.

Looking to purchase a home? Give Us A Call Today! (702) 696-9900 or (888) 931-9444

Resource: U.S.News

How Prepared Are You?

Buying a home can be a challenging experience for first-timers. Here are some mortgage tips to help get you started.

Start saving for a down payment early

It's quite common to put 20% down, but many lenders will now permit a much lesser percentage, and first-time buyers programs allow as little as 3% down. Putting down less than 20% could mean higher costs and paying for mortgage insurance, even a small down payment amount can still be hefty.

Explore your down payment and mortgage options

Check out the various loan programs:

Loan Terms:

Making a much higher down payment will mean having a lower monthly mortgage payment.

Research your state and local assistance programs

Many states offer assistance programs for first-time home buyers with perks such as down payment assistance, closing cost assistance, tax credits and discounted interest rates.

Determine how much home you can afford

You will need to now what's actually within your price range. Find your debt-to-income.

Check your credit

Your credit score (FICO) will be one of the key factors in whether you're approved, and it will help determine your interest rate and loan terms. Speak to an expert about any disputes you may have on your report.

Compare mortgage rates

We recommend comparing at least 3 lenders before making a decision. This could save you more money.

Get a preapproval letter

As you get closer to buying a home, it’s smart to get a preapproval, where the lender thoroughly examines your finances and confirms in writing how much it's willing to lend you, and under what terms. Having a preapproval letter in hand makes you look much more serious to a seller and can give you an upper hand over buyers who haven’t taken this step.

In a competitive real estate market with limited inventory, it’s likely you’ll bid on houses that get multiple offers so having a preapproval letter will increase your purchasing power.

Might Miss A Payment(s)?

We all know things happen that are out of our control. An unexpected medical bill or a car emergency. These types of situations can throw off your whole budget and cause you to worry about missing a mortgage payment or several payments. Do you know what to do?

Contact Your Mortgage Servicer

Always be prepared to tell the why you can't make your monthly payments and whether or not this is temporary or permanent and also provide them with other details about your income expenses. In some cases, your mortgage servicer may have programs in place to help you avoid that dreadful word, foreclosure.

Calling a HUD- approved housing counselor

It's free and can help you find a counselor near you. They can assist to help you figure out if you qualify for help and help you further understand any assistance your mortgage company  may have offered you.

Failure to Communicate/Pay

In general, not paying your mortgage will be reported by your lender to the three major credit bureaus and they will lower your credit score. In addition, after a grace period (generally a week to 15 days after the payment due date), a late fee will be added on to the payment you failed to make.**

Caution

When  you're going through a situation like this, it is imperative to watch out for scams. Never pay anyone to help you to avoid foreclosure. They might tell you they'll save your home foreclosure when they're really just taking your money.

If and when this ever happens make sure you're in contact with your mortgage servicer. They're more likely to work with you if you let them know before you miss a payment.some lenders being willing to offer informal forgiveness or being willing to hold off on late fees or reporting to credit agencies, in some cases people can qualify for forbearance programs. These are formal programs where people facing financial problems can miss a payment or make a lower payment for a period of time while they sort out financial problems.**

 

* Servicer- The company you make your payments to.

**Depends on the mortgage servicers discretion.

Visit Valley West Mortgage for our Online Application and our Secure Document Uploading

Before You Make That Investment

Purchasing a home is a major milestone that on many people's to-do-lists. You can take control of your home-buying process by understanding what it takes to purchase a home and what you should be asking.

Buying a home can be exciting but, it also can lead to some regret home-buying mistakes and with the housing prices gong up the added stress can confuse the process.

Let's look at some ways to prepare yourself of your first buying experience:

1. Determine What You Can Truly Afford

Determining your budget is the number one factor when purchasing a home. Rule of thumb, you should be looking at home \prices that are two to three time your annual income. This helps ensure you're not taking on a larger mortgage commitment that you can afford.

When coming up with the figure, try not to exceed 28% of your monthly gross income, look at your cash reserves saving up a minimum of 20% of your down payment plus another 3% for closing costs and enough savings left over to help pay for any home improvements or miscellaneous moving costs.

2. Figure out Which Mortgage is Right for You—and Get Pre-Approved

It's time to start shopping for a mortgage lender and we've got the right one for you. Valley West Mortgage offers Low Rates and No Obligation Pre-Approvals. Licensed in 18 States. We have a reputation of providing great customer service and timely closings. We will work with you throughout the whole buying process by helping you choose the right mortgage options for your situation.

3. Consider a Financial Trial Run

Totaling up all of your monthly expenses associated with a home purchase can ease the anxiety of not being able to afford a mortgage. It will allow some perspective on your current costs.

4. Decide Which Features Are Must-Haves and Nice-to-Haves

Brainstorming a list of must-haves and nice-to-haves allows you to look objectively at what houses you can may to work on or if it's move in ready. Finding what is most important will keep you from  paying more for what's not necessary and stay within your budget.

5. Start House-Hunting, and Decide If You Need a Real-Estate Agent

This is the time to decide if you're going to hire a real estate agent, if you haven't already. An agent can provide access to more home options than you'll likely find yourself. Find someone who understands your needs and represents you as the buyer and not the seller. Start viewing as many houses as possible.

6. Research Homeowner's Insurance

Most lenders will require the name of the agency providing you with home insurance. Shop around for a quote. Basic insurance typically covers fire, theft, storm damage and liability should someone get injured on your property and sue you. But you can also add on riders for things like expensive jewelry, furniture and home office equipment, as well as choose to get additional flood insurance if your home is in a flood-prone region.

7. Put in an Offer

Let's Make An Offer. You don't want to low-ball your offer, and risk losing the home to another buyer or insult the seller- but you also don't want to pay more than is necessary.

Look at other home sales in the area. If sold for an amount that's comparable to your seller's list price, you should be offering a number close to asking. Consider how long the home has been on the market? What's the market like in the neighborhood?

8. Review the Contract and Submit Your Mortgage Application

Pay special attention to contingencies in the contract, it will protect you in cases something goes wrong.

Home inspections can cost typically between $200 and $500. If there are issues, you may be able to ask for a price reduction to help cover the cost of repairs. Read it over carefully.

9. Sign the Papers

Before signing, you're entitled to a walk-through to confirm that nothing has changed since the inspection. Make sure the funds required for closing are wired into the correct account. Always, ask for copies.

On closing day, bring your I.D., as well as any paperwork you received throughout the process.

Congratulations You're a Homeowner!

Resources:

https://lifehacker.com/the-start-to-finish-guide-to-buying-a-home-1663317601

https://www.discover.com/home-loans/buying-guide/

https://www.zillow.com/home-buying-guide/